The Fey Man by James T. Kelly

cover

 

We want to welcome James T. Kelly to our blog, a good twitter friend and fellow published author, we wanted to share his new book with you! So we asked him a few questions and he was kind enough to answer them!

So James congratulations on getting The Fey Man published!!

Thank you! I still can’t believe it’s out there. It’s literally a dream come true. And thank you for inviting me to your blog!

1. What’s been the best part of the whole publishing process for you?

I think my favourite moment was holding that first paperback. I’ve been writing with a view to publication for almost fifteen years. So it’s been a very long road to The Fey Man, full of novels that will never see the light of day and abortive starts on other projects. But when it all culminated in seeing that paperback for the first time, that’s when it felt real. This was an actual book with my name on it. After all the years of work, that was really quite something.

2. Please tell us all about The Fey Man. (Ridley loves that it has dragons!)

The short version is that it’s about a man’s journey to return to Faerie and the war of dragons that gets in his way.

The longer version is that Thomas Rymour is a prophet who cannot lie, obsessed with returning to Faerie and reuniting with the queen of the fay. The elfs in the West are using magic to enslave dragons and invade the rest of Tir; the elfs in the East seek a fabled sword to break that magic. Tom thinks he can use that quest to get back to Faerie. But, of course, it’s not that easy.

I’ve tried to write the fantasy novel I always wanted to read, so it’s got fantasy staples like elfs, dragons, swords and quests. But it’s also got the fay of Faerie, a (very) reluctant hero, and a twist or a rethink for all of those staples. I hope the world I’ve created feels familiar enough that people want to enter but novel enough that they want to stay.

3. Do you see any of yourself in your main character Tom?

Oh sure. I’m a clueless, lovelorn liar too.

Joking aside, Tom’s the viewpoint character so I spend more time in his head than anyone else’s. Consequently he’s probably inherited more from me than the other characters. Tom, as he appears in The Fey Man at least, certainly reminds me a little of my younger self. He has a sort of teenage romanticism that I was prone to, a little victimhood, and a certain selfish and dogged drive to see his own desires fulfilled.

That said I think most characters start, if not with the writer asking “what would I do?”, than “what would make me do that?”. Even if characters are very dissimilar to their creators, they all begin with the writer and do ultimately reflect them in some way.

4. The Fey Man is an epic fantasy novel, why were you drawn to write in this genre in particular?

Well in truth I want to write in all the genres. The Fey Man was just the first story to be ready!

Fantasy is great because it’s so entangled with myths and legends. It’s filled with these evocative motifs that move and inspire us in fundamental ways. There’s a reason dragons and elfs and magic make so many appearances in fiction and, like I said before, I wanted to write them all as I wanted to see them!

5. We’ve said before we love the cover, did you work closely with the artist on it or did you give her free artistic reign?

I took the view that Annah’s the professional artist so her instincts are going to be better than mine. That viewpoint paid dividends! I gave her a detailed synopsis as well as a description of what I had in mind, but the rest was really all her. Her pencil sketch was just incredible. We discussed details and I made requests for amendments and tweaks, but that cover is far more Annah’s work than mine. I’m looking forward to working with her on the sequel.

6. Have you always wanted to be a writer, and was there any one thing, event or person that inspired you to become one?

I don’t think I can point to one thing that inspired me to be a writer. After all, I’d been writing stories since I was old enough to string words together. But a big part in moving me from hobbyist to aspirant was Orson Scott Card’s introduction to Ender’s Game, which chronicled the creation of the novel. It was one of the first times I realised that the writer was just a person making things up, and if they could do it, why couldn’t I?

Sadly my opinion of Orson Scott Card has diminished in light of some of the things he’s said about homosexuality, but I still have to credit that introduction to putting me on this path.

7. Tell us about your writing process, is there any time of the day or night you prefer to put pen to paper?

Any time is good writing time. I get up early to get an hour in before work (which is much harder in winter, let me tell you). I also write on my lunchbreak and, if I’m really on the ball, whenever I’ve got thirty seconds. That’s the great thing about the cloud; you can use whatever device you have to hand. For long stretches I use an iPad with a Bluetooth keyboard and my phone for shorter bursts. I much prefer writing with a physical keyboard and a decent-sized screen, though; a phone just isn’t good enough to write on for too long!

8. What is your favourite thing about being a writer?

That’s a really tough one. There are so many things! I like that I can daydream and call it work. I like that I can tell the stories I want to read. And I especially love it when people read and enjoy my work.

If I had to pick, though, I think it’s the creation itself. It’s quite exciting to sees story rush into the page from your fingertips. And then to go over it, cutting, amending, honing the raw, ugly prose into something you can be proud of. I’m probably gushing, but creating something where previously there was nothing? Yes, that’s my favourite thing!

9. So what’s next for James T Kelly?

The sequel! I’m beavering away on the second volume which moves the story into the belly of the beast: the Western Kingdom. I’ve got a few other projects I’m working on as well so there’s plenty to be getting on with.

Thanks for asking me, I hope I haven’t waffled on too much!

James

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Thanks so much for stopping by and answering our questions James! There definitely wasn’t too much waffle, in fact we’d love to hear more!

We wish James all the best with his new book! Make sure you check out The Fey Man on Amazon US, Amazon UK and Smashwords.

Twitter: @realkjtk
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Unbroken Ties, Keeping Secrets 2

We’re back! Yes it has been a while, but we’re picking up lots of momentum recently and everything is back on track and progressing nicely!

So here it is, the cover for our next book, due out at the end of August – drum roll please… Unbroken Ties, Keeping Secrets 2!

Book 2 cover!!

Book 2 cover!!

We hope you guys like it! Please let us know what you think. The cover was designed and made my ourselves here at MLR and we’re v.happy with the results!

So, yes, this is book 2 in our Keeping Secrets series (Young Adult, Urban Fantasy), continuing on from Legend Unleashed (Keeping Secrets 1). The synopsis for Unbroken Ties is…

Unbroken Ties, Keeping Secrets Book 2

Trouble is brewing and tensions are high in Carwick, where Temperance is struggling to belong.

The wizards distrust her, the werewolves despise her, and someone wants her dead.

With Halvard’s duties drawing him further from her, and the surprise return of her brother, chaos grips Carwick, and Temperance soon finds her loyalty to her family tested like never before….

We hope you’ll come back to Carwick with us for the next story! If you haven’t already checked out Legend Unleashed, please click here to read some excerpts and see the book trailers! Or you can pop on over to Amazon!

 

Signed Books Blog Hop

signed book hop

April 16-22

Signed Book Blog Hop (International Giveaway )

We’re excited to be part of the Signed Book Blog Hop hosted by the fantastic I Am a Reader, Not a Writer and Wholly Books!

Today we have a fantastic read up for grabs, it is a signed The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green. Whether you’ve read it or not, this is a must have for any bookshelf! 😀

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Book description (from amazon):

‘Despite the tumor-shrinking medical miracle that has bought her a few years, Hazel has never been anything but terminal, her final chapter inscribed upon diagnosis. But when a gorgeous plot twist named Augustus Waters suddenly appears at Cancer Kid Support Group, Hazel’s story is about to be completely rewritten.’

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Click HERE to go to the Rafflecopter and enter!

Best of luck!

Next on the blog hop is number 50, Celestial Reviews!

For the full list:

Giveaway

We’ve off on our blog tour, in the mean time, here’s a great giveaway!

LEGEND UNLEASHED GIVEAWAY

While you’re here, if you’re free, why not follow along on our tour!

You can use our portkeys (otherwise known as linkys!) or apparate if you are of age!!

Virtual Book Tour December 1 – December 15
December 1 – Reading Addiction Blog Tours – Meet and Greet
December 2 – Paulette’s Papers – Guest Post/PROMO
December 3 – My Cozie Corner Review
December 4 – Little Book Star – PROMO
December 5 – Read Review Smile – Review
December 6 – Laurie’s Thoughts and Reviews – Review/Interview
December 7 – Pure Textuality – Guest Post/PROMO
December 8 – Fuonlyknew – Review/PROMO (Thank you to Laura for having us and letting us do a giveaway! :))
December 10 – A Dream Within a Dream – Review
December 11 – Magical Manuscripts – Review
December 12 – Rolling With the Moments
December 15 – James T Kelly – Interview (Thank you to James for letting us gate-crash his blog for an interview!)
December 17- Magical Manuscript Interview – Interview (Return to Magical Manuscripts for a belated interview – thank you to Sandy for having us again! Hope we didn’t wreck the place :))

Dracula and Bram Stoker

What’s Bram Stoker got to do with Dublin?

Latimer: I admit that up until a few years ago, I didn’t know that Bram Stoker was Irish (maybe you do and you are gasping at my ignorance right now). It was actually a bit of a shock to me when I found out.

He is, for some unknown reason, not a writer we often talk about. He passes unnoticed.

While we wax lyrical about Joyce and Wilde, we never mention Stoker.

Another famous son 🙂

While vampire’s and vampirism literature were around long before Stoker’s time, he is now remembered as the creator of vampire lore. It just goes to show the power of his story-telling. He never even visited Romania.

Bran’s Castle, Vlad the Impaler’s castle

Bram Stoker started life as a very sickly child, spending his early years bed-ridden (up until the age of 7yrs). People say this is probably what led to the development of his fantastical imagination. Bram himself remarked later; “I was naturally thoughtful, and the leisure of long illness gave opportunity for many thoughts which were fruitful according to their kind in later years.”

When he grew up, he left the sick-bed behind. He attended Trinity College Dublin (TCD 🙂 ), played rugby and was a fantastic athlete like many other members of his family.

But, why am I talking about Stoker?

Recently I attended a talk about Bram Stoker’s medical family. And at this talk, I learned that this year is the centenary of Bram Stoker’s death and Dublin is readying itself to celebrate its, bizarrely overlooked son, with the first Festival of Bram Stoker, which will be held in October.

The Stoker’s shaped Dublin in many ways and were very influential at the time in Ireland.

They were a very well-to-do family. They lived in many grand houses dotted around Dublin. If you’ve ever been to the city, you’ll know there are lots of old Georgian style town houses around the streets. Bram Stoker’s family home is preserved on Kildare St (which is very near Trinity College). 

They were an intelligent family; there were 4 boys, including Bram, the 3 other brothers became doctors. And they had 9 cousins that also became doctors.

Sir William Thornley Stoker, President of RCSI

Bram Stoker’s brother, Sir William Thornley Stoker, was the former President of the Royal College of Surgeons Ireland (RCSI). Because his cousin William Stoker, was also a doctor, Sir William went by the name ‘Thornley’. I think that’s a cool name, Thornley Stoker… sounds, strangely enough, like a vampire hunter!  

Bram wasn’t interested in being a doctor. He studied mathematics in Trinity. He was also an active member of the University Philosophical Society. He petitioned for a young Oscar Wilde to join the society. He would eventually end up marrying Florence Balcombe, Wilde’s childhood sweetheart. When Wilde realised they were engaged, he left Ireland more or less for good, only returning twice more in his life. But, when Wilde was living in Europe (after his release from prison), Stoker would often visit him.

Lyceum Theatre, London

After a few years working in Dublin, Bram moved to England to become the manager of the Lyceum Theatre and of Henry Irving (the most famous and best actor of the day).

Bram also got to work on writing Dracula. He was a very methodical writer. He had a book that contained all of his notes, and timetables of events in the story. He would write down train timetables, to make sure that when trains appeared in his book, they ran according to the correct schedule. He also often wrote to his brother Sir William and would ask his medical opinion on any such events in the book. Sir William would write back and tell him, ‘yes, if he is hit here, this will happen’ and what pressure points should be detailed.

Brams notes

There was speculation that Bram got a lot of inspiration for the Dracula novel from stories his mother would tell him about the cholera epidemics in Sligo (where she was from). She would tell him stories about people being buried alive (which apparently they often were during the cholera epidemics).

Events and stories were noted in his notebook, along with newspaper clippings of strange events or interesting things that happened around him.

Dracula was published in 1897- and a first edition of the book, today is worth 250,000 euro!!

Original cover

The Bram Stoker society in Ireland is trying hard to get Stoker more recognised as an Irishman. They are collecting money to commission a statue of Bram Stoker to be put on display in Dublin.

The city is known for its statues… we have a lot!

Patrick Kavanagh, on the canal bench

Oscar Wilde in Merrion Park

Brendan Behan, Royal Canal just off Dorset Street

James Joyce, North Earl Street just off O’Connell Street

Children of Lir, Garden of Remembrance Parnell Square

Irish Famine statues, North Quays

Joyce and Wilde are happily on display… the poet Patrick Kavanagh sits (unhappily perhaps!) on a bench by the canal; but no Stoker!

Dublin is trying to reclaim Stoker- and why not? Hopefully it works; I think it would be nice to have a statue of Bram Stoker in Dublin. It was really interesting hearing about how his family shaped various parts of Dublin.

Myself and Ridley are primed and ready to go to the Stoker Festival! Stay tuned for that post 🙂

Bram Stoker Festival 2012 Post